Operation Transformation: Irish Business Lacking in Digital Revolution

ipandandcomputer-1200x800.jpg

Digital Transformation in Irish Business ‘Struggling’ to Meet the Challenge

John Holden reports in today’s (4th May 2017) Irish Times, that “struggling” is the term most associated with Irish Businesses when it comes to Digital Transformation, according to the recently-released 2017 KingramRed Digital Transformation Report. Surveying a multitude of Irish business sectors, the report found senior-level staff are “not developing a vision of their digital future.” Further, “leadership capabilities and awareness are not sufficiently developed in this area to drive direction and mitigate risks.” 

Of the organizations included in the report, less than half had developed a set strategy for future digital improvement in order to stay competitive in a digital landscape. A mere 53 percent of businesses surveyed acknowledged an immediate necessity to establish a digital strategy. 

Autopilot: Digital Leadership

A majority of those surveyed felt the move to digital lay below upper-level management and executives, believing it was the responsibility of IT departments, instead. Out of the participants at management and senior-levels, 60 percent stated that digital transformation was not a crucial issue for CEOs. 

This neglect of senior-level employees in leading digital transformation has caused preparation efforts to become “dissipated in silos across organizations.”

Adoption Agents: Implementing Digital in Irish Business

Irish sectors including finance, analytics, and agriculture were included in this second report by the KingramRed digital consultancy firm. The survey considered businesses’ engagement with developing technologies, such as analytics, AI, smart devices, and robotics. 

Out of organizations surveyed, 65 percent were already engaged with technologies such as algorithms and data analytics, with a “further 20 percent expecting to take advantage within two years.”

Alternatively, robotics proved to be a technology that Irish businesses have been hesitant to adopt. Only “30 per cent of organisations” are currently examining how to implement robotic solutions in their business or considering adopting robotics.

Digital Transformation Screens

This lack of advancement in digital transformation could be boiled down to one major agreement in the report. A strong majority felt there is a current “shortage of skills and resources,” making it difficult to implement a digital transformation strategy. Although 72 percent of participants are funding digital in their businesses, only half of business are confident in their digital resources, claiming that their organizations have the skills necessary to implement digital action plans. 

Overall, the report claimed that “the shortage of resources and skills is a serious challenge to driving forward with change.”

DLR Summit